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Checks to Perform on Ship before Coming out of the Dry Dock

It is extremely important to maintain a checklist of things and procedure to be done before undocking and not to miss any vital point which will lead to delay in undocking.
Following things must be checked by a responsible engineer and deck officers before water is filled up in the dock:
  • All Departments in charge to confirm that repairs assigned under their departments are completed successful with tests and surveys are carried out
  • Check rudder plug and vent and also check if anode are fitted back on rudder
  • Check hull for proper coating of paint; make sure no TBT based paint is used.
  • Check Impressed Current Cathodic Protection system (ICCP) anodes are fitted in position and cover removed
  • Check Anodes are fitted properly on hull and cover removed (if ICCP is not installed)
  • Check all double bottom tank plugs are secured
  • Check all sea inlets and sea chests gratings are fitted
  • Check echo sounder and logs are fitted and covers removed
  • Check of propeller and rudder are clear from any obstruction
  • Check if anchor and anchor chain is secured on board
  • Check all external connection (shore water supply, shore power cables) are removed
  • Check inside the ship all repaired overboard valve are in place
  • Secure any moving item inside the ship
  • Check sounding of all tank and match them with the value obtain prior entering the dry dock
  • Check stability and trim of the ship. Positive GM should be maintained at all time
  • If there is any load shift or change in stability, inform  the dock master
  • Go through the checklist again and satisfactory checklist to be signed by Master
  • Master to sign authority for Flood Certificate
  • When flooding reaches overboard valve level, stop it and check all valves and stern tube for leaks
  • Instruction to every crew member to be vigilant while un-docking

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