Monday, June 1, 2020

Anchor bolts

There are two main types of rotary vane steering gear in use today. One has its stator firmly fixed to the steering flat deck and the stator housing and cover are provided with suitable bearings to enable the unit to act as a combined rudder carrier and rudder stock bearing support. The other type of vane gear is supported where the stator is only anchored to the ships structure to resist torque but is free to move vertically within the constraints of the separate rudder head bearing and carrier which is similar to the bearing provided for ram type steering gears.
The rudder carrier ring bearing (Pallister Bearing) is taking the weight of the rotary vane steering gear and the rudder and stock.

 Rotation of the stator is prevented by means of two anchor brackets and two anchor bolts . The anchor brackets are securely bolted to the stool and vertical clearance is arranged between the inside of the Stator flanges and the top and bottom of the anchor brackets to allow for vertical movement of the rudder stock. This clearance varies with each size of rotary unit but could be about 40 mm total . It is essential that the rudder carrier should be capable of restricting the vertical movements of the rudder stock to less than this amount.


The anchor bolts are fitted with special bushes in halves, shaped externally in order to pre-load the synthetic rubber shock absorbers , which are fitted between them and the anchor brackets. The maximum deflection of the shock absorbers under full load is approximately 1 mm.



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